The navicular bone of the horse is also known as the distal sesamoid bone. Anatomy defines a sesamoid bone as a bone embedded within a tendon. Sesamoid bones are typically found in locations where a tendon passes over a joint, lies on the palmar.

The equine forelimb is the front, or thoracic limb of the horse. It is attached to the trunk of the animal by purely muscular connections between the second phalanx.

Horse Navicular

The name Phalanges is commonly given to the bones that form fingers and toes. In primates such as humans and monkeys, the thumb and big toe have two phalanges, while the other fingers and toes consist of three phalanges. The third phalanx is known as the coffin or pedal bone.

The equine forelimb is the front, or thoracic limb of the horse. It is attached to the trunk of the animal by purely muscular connections.

Like humans, horses can experience some serious bone injuries too. It can suffer from an open fracture when an arm or a leg twists in such a navicular diseases in horsesway that the broken bone ends tear through the skin, causing an open wound. On the other hand, a closed fracture is a bone injury where the skin is not broken; this type of fracture is much more common than an open fracture. An open fracture brings with it a chance of infection and also severe bleeding.

A horse may also suffer from dislocation which is typically more noticeable than a fracture. A dislocation occurs when a bone moves away from its normal position at a joint. A violent force tears the ligaments that hold the bone in place at a joint, and the joint will no longer function. Usually, the displaced bone causes an obviously abnormal bump, ridge or hollow.